Biodiversity

Our Local Nature Map

View from Windmill Hill, Upper Beeding

Mapping our local habitats

Before undertaking any biodiversity or conservation project it is important to get to know and understand the area that you are working with. You need to find out what is already there; to actually look at what you have. Only then can you put together a vision of what you would like to have. Then you can plan how you are going to get from one to the other.

How do you find out what you have got? 

Children by the River Adur, Upper Beeding

You do a survey of the local area and, in this case, record all the different habitats you find and then you turn this data into a Nature Map which everyone can understand and use.

And you use lots of people to help collect the information you need. People like you.

So, in the Spring 2021 we sent out trained volunteers, with OS maps and coloured pens, to cover an area of a mile and a half around Steyning, Bramber and Beeding to record the different habitats they came across. Simple!

We ran an initial training session to run through what needed to be recorded and and how to record it (see video), with a follow up session out in the field, and you can see the results in the interactive map below.

We are still looking for enthusiastic volunteers to help with the mapping, you’ll be trained so don’t worry about knowledge and experience. If interested contact Action Group Co-ordinator Ronnie 

And here are the results!

The interactive map below shows the information our fantastic volunteers collected about the local habitats. Using the Habitat Map Key in the bottom righthand corner, you can see the results of the survey displayed on the map.

And this is the original map that was created by hand to show all the habitats:

steyning nature map